About

This autumn The Waterdrop project between the Kòpavogur Municipality (IS), H.C. Andersen Museum (DK), The Moomin Museum (FI) and Ilon’s Wonderland (EE) is the first international, cross-disciplinary cultural program that combines the classics of Nordic children’s literature with teaching children about the UN Development Goals. The project was developed in a network supported by Nordic Culture Fund and Nordic Culture Point from December 2019- May 2020. 

Between 2020 and 2023, the large-scale cultural production invites Icelandic and other Nordic school children of all backgrounds to become co-creators of a cultural program of exhibitions and events in collaboration with the project partners and invited guests – natural scientists, contemporary children’s authors, and artists working with nature, among other informal educators. The ‘Young Curators’ will be selected through Open Calls that value their unique ideas and self-expression. The goal of the children’s involvement is to make a broad range of Nordic children feel heard and begin to understand themselves as part of a united Nordic region that they have the opportunity to shape with their own ideas and activities. 

In this interactive way, the project aims to teach the children about important values such as ecology, equality, sustainability, and tolerance, which are represented not only by the UN goals, but also frequently found in the stories of Nordic children’s literature. In addition, the project wants to encourage cultural institutions to share ideas, skills, and resources for children’s involvement in cultural production. The goal is to empower more Nordic institutions to develop cultural programs that use an innovative combination of informal education and cultural events to introduce children to shared humanitarian values. 

The Waterdrop will be launched publicly in October 2020 in Kòpavogur (IS), and center around three exhibitions set during spring each year until 2023, as well as the three connected children’s workshops for each exhibitions in Iceland, Denmark, and Finland.